This blog documents the making of an audio visual installation, from scratch, to the opening day.
A project by Joanie Lemercier [AntiVJ] and Visual System (see full credits).
Opening: June 21st at the Atomium, Brussels, Belgium. (get an invite)

You will find here sketches, storyboard, production documents, source files and code.


INSPIRATION: SKETCHING (3/3)One of my favorite step of the creative process is to doodle for hours to understand the structure, shape and space I’m working with.In this case I drew the low poly planet several times using the stippling technique.This drawing was shown at an exhibition at Muriel Guépin gallery in NYC last April, and also Art Basel in June 2013, and the piece is available through the gallery.
joanielemercier:

New drawing: Stippling.Exhibition opens in 2 days.

INSPIRATION: SKETCHING (3/3)

One of my favorite step of the creative process is to doodle for hours to understand the structure, shape and space I’m working with.

In this case I drew the low poly planet several times using the stippling technique.
This drawing was shown at an exhibition at Muriel Guépin gallery in NYC last April, and also Art Basel in June 2013, and the piece is available through the gallery.


joanielemercier
:

New drawing: Stippling.
Exhibition opens in 2 days.

INSPIRATION: SKETCHING (2/3)One of my favorite step of the creative process is to doodle for hours to understand the structure, shape and space I’m working with.
In this case I drew the low poly planet several times using the stippling technique.joanielemercier: Shading experiments using only dots.

INSPIRATION: SKETCHING (2/3)

One of my favorite step of the creative process is to doodle for hours to understand the structure, shape and space I’m working with.

In this case I drew the low poly planet several times using the stippling technique.

joanielemercier
Shading experiments using only dots.

INSPIRATION: SKETCHING (1/3)One of my favorite step of the creative process is to doodle for hours to understand the structure, shape and space I’m working with.In this case I drew the low poly planet several times using the stippling technique.joanielemercier: Sketchbook and projection.

INSPIRATION: SKETCHING (1/3)

One of my favorite step of the creative process is to doodle for hours to understand the structure, shape and space I’m working with.

In this case I drew the low poly planet several times using the stippling technique.

joanielemercier
Sketchbook and projection.

joanielemercier: BIG ORIGAMI

joanielemercierBIG ORIGAMI

LASER CUTTER

Usually, I print my
Pepakura templates onto paper, and I then cut and fold all the different pieces manually to make small objects.

This time I wanted to use a thicker cardboard to build my structure, and it would have taken ages to cut and fold the 396 polygons one by one, so I started looking into other options.

FAB LAB Brussels.
The IMAL is an Art center + Media lab which opened in 2007, it’s an exhibition space, they host events, workshops and Artists residencies, and they just opened a Fab Lab space last September, with quite a lot of equipment: 3D printers, a CNC plotter and a laser cutter.
I got in touch with the Director Yves Bernard, and they offered me a short residency with access to the equipment. Many thanks to Felix Luque for his help and tips !

FROM A 3D MODEL TO A FLAT TEMPLATE: PEPAKURASo the first attempt at building the structure with technical materials was totally out of budget, so I had to come up with a new idea, and a more DIY approach, otherwise the project wouldn’t happen.I’ve discovered an amazing software back in 2010 (thanks to Pierre Vanni), which purpose is to break all the faces of a 3D model, and it gives you a flat template that you can easily print and fold. An incredible tool to bring virtual designs into the physical world.Pepakura is developed by a Japanese team, and it only costs 38$.It seem to be mostly used to build small objects and toys, but there’s no reason why you couldn’t use it for larger scale projects.You can also find alternatives on this forum.If you’d like to make your own little planet, you can download the source files here.

FROM A 3D MODEL TO A FLAT TEMPLATE: PEPAKURA

So the first attempt at 
building the structure with technical materials was totally out of budget, so I had to come up with a new idea, and a more DIY approach, otherwise the project wouldn’t happen.

I’ve discovered an amazing software back in 2010 (thanks to Pierre Vanni), which purpose is to break all the faces of a 3D model, and it gives you a flat template that you can easily print and fold. An incredible tool to bring virtual designs into the physical world.

Pepakura is developed by a Japanese team, and it only costs 38$.
It seem to be mostly used to build small objects and toys, but there’s no reason why you couldn’t use it for larger scale projects.
You can also find alternatives on this forum.

If you’d like to make your own little planet, you can download the source files here.

INSPIRATION: PIERRE VANNI.A few years back, I discovered the work of the very talented french graphic designer Pierre Vanni, and I was fascinated by his paper series, and his very singular approach to simple low poly designs: terrain, animals, strange objects and beautiful compositions for festivals and publications such as the New York Times Style Magazine.I also just discovered one of his recent poster based on geometrical planets while writing this post: FULL MOONBack in 2010, I was lucky enough to do a small project with Pierre Vanni, we teamed up to do a piece together at Centre Pompidou in Paris. We created a physical structure, half a sphere that was a canvas for a layer of light projection. The piece was interactive, and the ambiant sound were used to control the paper moon revolution, pattern and shape, unfortunately we don’t have many pictures from this first collaboration.FULL MOON. Interactive installation by Pierre Vanni and Joanie Lemercier (2010).
At the time, Pierre told me one of his secrets for the making of his paper structures, that I will develop more in the next post, a genius japanese software: Pepakura.

INSPIRATION: PIERRE VANNI.

A few years back, I discovered the work of the very talented french graphic designer
Pierre Vanni, and I was fascinated by his paper series, and his very singular approach to simple low poly designs: terrain, animals, strange objects and beautiful compositions for festivals and publications such as the New York Times Style Magazine.
I also just discovered one of his recent poster based on geometrical planets while writing this post: 




FULL MOON

Back in 2010, I was lucky enough to do a small project with Pierre Vanni, we teamed up to do a piece together at Centre Pompidou in Paris. We created a physical structure, half a sphere that was a canvas for a layer of light projection. The piece was interactive, and the ambiant sound were used to control the paper moon revolution, pattern and shape, unfortunately we don’t have many pictures from this first collaboration.


FULL MOON. Interactive installation by Pierre Vanni and Joanie Lemercier (2010).

At the time, Pierre told me one of his secrets for the making of his paper structures, that I will develop more in the next post, a genius japanese software: Pepakura.